INFORMS News: Easley, Kleinberg receive Lanchester Prize

INFORMS President Rina Schneur and Committee Chair Michael Fu flank Lanchester Prize winner Jon Kleinberg. David Easley (not pictured) shared the award with his colleague, Kleinberg.

INFORMS President Rina Schneur and Committee Chair Michael Fu flank Lanchester Prize winner Jon Kleinberg. David Easley (not pictured) shared the award with his colleague, Kleinberg.

David Easley and Jon Kleinberg of Cornell University received the 2011 Lanchester Prize from INFORMS for their book, “Networks, Crowds and Markets: Reasoning About a Highly Connected World,” Cambridge University Press, New York, 2010. Lanchester Committee Chair Michael Fu presented the award at the INFORMS Annual Meeting in Charlotte, N.C.

The Lanchester Prize honors the best paper or series of papers on operations research and the management sciences published in English.

The award citation read in part:

The study of networks has always been a central focus of operations research and the management sciences from the beginnings of the field, drawing from applications such as logistics, transportation, and telecommunications. More recently, there has been a growing public fascination with the complex connectedness of modern society. This connectedness is found in many incarnations: in the rapid growth of the Internet, in the ease with which global communication takes place and in the ability of news and information, as well as epidemics and financial crises, to spread with surprising speed and intensity. These are phenomena that involve networks, incentives and the aggregate behavior of groups of people; they are based on the links that connect us and the ways in which our decisions can have subtle consequences for others.

Starting with graph theory and game theory, this introductory-level textbook makes a remarkable effort to write for a broad audience and takes an interdisciplinary approach toward understanding complex networks and social behavior. It describes an emerging field that addresses fundamental questions about how the social, economic and technological worlds are connected.