Boyd wins Saul Gass Expository Writing Award

Dimitris Bertsimas (pictured) announced that Stephen Boyd of Stanford was the 2014 recipient of the Saul Gass Expository Writing Award. Boyd was unable to attend the ceremony.

Dimitris Bertsimas (pictured) announced that Stephen Boyd of Stanford was the 2014 recipient of the Saul Gass Expository Writing Award. Boyd was unable to attend the ceremony.

Stephen Boyd, the Samsung Professor of Engineering and a professor of electrical engineering in the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University, was named the 2014 recipient of the Saul Gass Expository Writing Prize at the INFORMS Annual Meeting in San Francisco. Committee Chair Dimitris Bertsimas presented the award.

Named in honor of the late Saul Gass, an O.R. pioneer and an extraordinary and prolific writer, the prize recognizes an operations researcher/management scientist whose publications demonstrate a consistently high standard of expository writing.

The citation read in part:

Professor Boyd is the author of many research articles and three books: “Convex Optimization” (with Lieven Vandenberghe, 2004), “Linear Matrix Inequalities in System and Control Theory” (with L. El Ghaoui, E. Feron, and V. Balakrishnan, 1994) and “Linear Controller Design: Limits of Performance” (with Craig Barratt, 1991). His group has produced several open source tools, including CVX (with Michael Grant), a widely used parser-solver for convex optimization.

Through his written works, Professor Boyd has made convex optimization accessible to a very large audience, especially in engineering schools. His book “Convex Optimization” is full of exciting applications, is lucidly written and has been used to teach convex optimization to tens of thousands of students worldwide. The corresponding graduate-level class he teaches at Stanford attracts more than 200 students, making it one of the university’s most popular classes. The book has more than 21,000 citations in Google scholar.

His book “Matrix Inequalities in System and Control Theory” is also nicely written and has introduced advanced semi-definite optimizations methods to the theory control community. The book has more than 15,000 citations in Google scholar.

His survey papers on “Semi-definite Optimization” (with Lieven Vandenberghe, 1996) and “Applications of Second Order Cone Constraints” (with Miguel Lobo, Lieven Vandenberghe, Herve Lebret, 1998) are examples of writing clarity that have had a significant impact on popularizing convex optimization.

In general, the expository excellence of Professor Boyd’s books and publications has helped to disseminate his ideas across the operations research and management science communities.