COIN-OR wins Impact Prize

Impact Prize presenter Michael Fry (far left) and INFORMS President Steve Robinson (far right) congratulate COIN-OR founders for winning the Impact Prize.

Impact Prize presenter Michael Fry (far left) and INFORMS President Steve Robinson (far right) congratulate COIN-OR founders for winning the Impact Prize. The group includes, left to right, starting second from left: Robin Lougee, Brenda Dietrich, John Forrest and J.P. Fasano of IBM, Brady Hunsaker of Google, Laszlo Ladanyi of IBM, Theodore Ralphs of Lehigh University and Matthew Saltzman of Clemson University. Missing: Lou Hafer of Simon Fraser University.

INFORMS recognized a longstanding open source software program with its 2014 INFORMS Impact Prize for the developers’ creation of software that has spurred the growth of new applications over its more than a dozen years of existence.

The Computational Infrastructure for Operations Research (COIN-OR) initiative was launched at the 2000 International Symposium on Mathematical Programming as a three-year experiment by IBM Research. In 2004, a nonprofit corporation was formed to take over the initiative. It has grown from an initial four software projects to more than 50 projects spanning much of computational operations research.

Awarded every other year, the INFORMS Impact Prize is intended to recognize contributions that have had a broad impact on the field of operations research. This year’s prize was presented at the 2014 INFORMS Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

Software supported by COIN-OR has been an essential part of hundreds of peer-reviewed research papers and is embedded in dozens of software systems, including the most widely used environments for performing analytics.

The prize recipients are Brenda Dietrich, IBM; J.P. Fasano, IBM; Lou Hafer, Simon Fraser University; John Forrest, IBM; Brady Hunsaker, Google; Laszlo Ladanyi, IBM; Robin Lougee, IBM; Ted Ralphs, Lehigh University; and Matthew Saltzman, Clemson University.