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Update on supply chain disruption

Update on supply chain disruption

WBRC, March 14, 2022

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WBRC) - Everyone is feeling the impact of the supply chain disruption. The disruption issues were blamed on the pandemic. Experts said the inability to get products from manufacturers to consumers quickly, and inexpensively, is causing prices to soar.

Ukraine war and anti-Russia sanctions on top of COVID-19 mean even worse trouble lies ahead for global supply chains

Ukraine war and anti-Russia sanctions on top of COVID-19 mean even worse trouble lies ahead for global supply chains

The Conversation, March 11, 2022

Francis Fukuyama, the American political scientist who once described the collapse of the Soviet Union as the “end of history,” suggested that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine might be called “the end of the end of history.” He meant that Vladimir Putin’s aggression signals a rollback of the ideals of a free Europe that emerged after 1991. Some observers suggest it may kick off a new Cold War, with an Iron Curtain separating the West from Russia.

When it comes to masks, the claim that they do nothing is entirely false

When it comes to masks, the claim that they do nothing is entirely false

Newswise, March 11, 2022

Political commentator and radio host Clay Travis expressed his disdain for the federal mask mandates for travel on commercial airlines. He tweeted on March 10, "The Biden administration has extended the mask mandates on airplanes for another thirty days. (It was expiring March 18th). Aside from the fact that masks do nothing, what imbeciles are still in favor of this mandate? If you truly think masks work you can wear one like an idiot." We rate the claim that "masks do nothing" as false. It has been proven that masks have helped prevent the spread of SARS-COV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Several studies have shown that widespread mask-wearing is associated with reductions in disease transmission of COVID-19.

Sheldon Jacobson: March Madness and advanced analytics

Sheldon Jacobson: March Madness and advanced analytics

TribLive, March 11, 2022

March Madness begins March 15. Blue-blood programs like Villanova, Duke and Kansas are locks to make the tournament. Mid-majors like Loyola-Chicago and Murray State hope to pull upsets and advance to the second weekend. Virginia Commonwealth and BYU are just hoping for a spot in the Big Dance.

Rebuilding Infrastructure Requires Rethinking Supply Chains

Rebuilding Infrastructure Requires Rethinking Supply Chains

NEMA, March 10, 2022

Supply chains continue to be the defining economic story in the U.S. Our most basic economic inputs — energy, semiconductors, and raw materials, e.g., lumber, metals, plastics — are still hitting snags. Meanwhile, as the previous issue of electroindustry covered, the country is poised to embark on a once-in-generation infrastructure buildout. Yes, it’s time to build. But for our supply chains, it’s time to rebuild and rethink.

This is what the future of living with COVID in schools looks like

This is what the future of living with COVID in schools looks like

Fast Company, March 10, 2022

This past October, in Baltimore, high school students had to show proof that they were fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or submit to weekly testing, in order to play sports. While Baltimore has made that call, the story is different in other neighboring districts, like Cecil County and Allegany County, where public schools are not asking for vaccination status or doing surveillance testing of any kind. Like many states across the U.S. there are no longer unified COVID protocols. Decisions on vaccine and mask mandates, events, field trips, and even if parents are allowed in school buildings are left to the individual school districts to decide.

Sheldon Jacobson: When March Madness meets STEM, everyone wins

Sheldon Jacobson: When March Madness meets STEM, everyone wins

The Chicago Tribune, March 10, 2022

High-paying jobs in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) are plentiful, with millions going unfilled every year. In 2018, 2.4 million STEM jobs sat empty, with no qualified candidates available and few in the pipeline to backfill the deficit. The COVID-19 pandemic also had a less severe impact on people in STEM positions, with many able to transition to remote work with greater ease than those in non-STEM fields.

Russian war threatens food supply

Russian war threatens food supply

Agri-View, March 9, 2022

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) – The Russian tanks and missiles besieging Ukraine also are threatening the food supply and livelihoods of people in Europe, Africa and Asia. Those people rely on the vast, fertile farmlands of the Black Sea region – known as the “breadbasket of the world.”

How Ukraine’s small missiles help defend against a bigger invader

How Ukraine’s small missiles help defend against a bigger invader

Brock University, March 8, 2022

When Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy told the world last month, “I need ammunition, not a ride,” the ammo he especially wanted was anti-tank and anti-aircraft missiles. Since then, countries around the world have energetically responded, sending shipments that include Javelin anti-tank missiles and Strela anti-aircraft missiles.

Anna Nagurney with John Moore

Anna Nagurney with John Moore

Newstalk, March 7, 2022

Anna Nagurney, professor of supply chains, logistics and economics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, explains to Moore In The Morning how Russia’s invasion of Ukraine (Europe’s bread basket) could cause shortages, higher prices, and possibly even a famine across three continents.