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FCC, TBS cited for analytics prowess

FCC, TBS cited for analytics prowess

Broadcasting & Cable, January 6, 2018

What does the FCC's incentive auction and Turner's efforts to provide better demographic ad targeting have in common? Both are competing for the same prestigious award, the 2018 INFORMS Franz Edelman Award for Achievements in Operations Research and Management Science.

Uncommon knowledge: Bros, basketball, and business economics

Uncommon knowledge: Bros, basketball, and business economics

Boston Globe, January 6, 2018

Bros don't know. In a new study in the INFORMS journal Management Science, individuals and groups of three were given general-knowledge and forecasting questions. All-male groups had worse discussion dynamics than groups with at least one woman. As a result, their judgments were more poorly calibrated than the other groups’ — and even compared to individual men or women.

FCC, TBS cited for analytics prowess

FCC, TBS cited for analytics prowess

Multichannel News, January 5, 2018

FCC and Turner broadcasting are among those listed among the six finalists for the prestigious 2018 INFORMS Franz Edelman Award for Achievements in Operations Research and Management Science.

Study: When artists are depressed, their art has less value

Study: When artists are depressed, their art has less value

The Clyde Fitch Report, January 5, 2018

We’ve all heard the story of Vincent van Gogh cutting his ear off and of Jackson Pollock’s alcoholism and depression. The struggles facing the creative “genius” are so ingrained in our culture that it has its own moniker: “tortured artists.” Some of the greatest creators of all time are synonymous with depression. But a new study in the INFORMS journal Management Science finds that work created by artists when they are unhappy is valued less than their other works.

Chairman Pai on FCC selection as finalist for Edelman Award

Chairman Pai on FCC selection as finalist for Edelman Award

Federal Communications Commission, January 4, 2018

The Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) today announced that it has selected the Federal Communications Commission as one of six finalists for the 47th annual Franz Edelman Award for Achievements in Operations Research and Management Science, which recognizes corporate, non-profit, and governmental organizations that have used operations research and related tools to solve complex problems. Chairman Ajit Pai issued a statement.

Three INFORMS journal articles recognized with 2017 Responsible Research in Management Award
This researcher just solved college football’s biggest mystery. She can predict where high school players will commit.

This researcher just solved college football’s biggest mystery. She can predict where high school players will commit.

The Washington Post, December 20, 2017

There is an entire industry built up around deciphering where 16- and 17-year-olds will play college football. Websites boast “crystal ball” predictions of where top high school recruits will suit up. Companies charge for premium subscriptions with claims that they can decode the caprice and whimsy of children. However a new mathematical model can predict with 70 percent accuracy where a high school football player will go to college using nothing but their basic biographical information and Twitter account. The paper on these findings was published this month in the INFORMS journal Decision Analysis.

"No-name" musicians benefit from streaming

"No-name" musicians benefit from streaming

Pressetext, December 20, 2017

While free or low-threshold music streaming sources such as Spotify paying more and more users to more expensive platforms like iTunes, they are also providing one greater popularity of less popular artists beyond the "Top 100," according to a new study in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science

Why signing a noncompete agreement is bad for you - and the economy

Why signing a noncompete agreement is bad for you - and the economy

Quartz, December 20, 2017

A study recently published in the INFORMS journal Management Science finds lower rates of within-industry entrepreneurship in states with strong noncompete enforcement. Using data on about 5.5 million new firms in 30 states, the researchers found that strongly bound workers were significantly less likely to build new companies within the same industry.

All politics — and cannabis marketing — are local

All politics — and cannabis marketing — are local

UC Davis News, December 14, 2017

California’s legal cannabis market, opening for business on Jan. 1, is expected to quickly grow to be the largest in the nation and worth more than $5 billion a year. County voting on Proposition 64 that led the state here — to legalizing sales for recreational use — can offer insight into how medical marijuana dispensaries will now market themselves, according to a new study in the INFORMS journal Organization Science.

New tool to improve kidney transplant success, reduce costs

New tool to improve kidney transplant success, reduce costs

UBC News, December 6, 2017

Waitlists for life-saving kidney transplants are long and every donated kidney is precious. That’s why patients on the waitlist are screened regularly to ensure their suitability for transplant. But is the screening process as effective as it could be? A new study in the INFORMS journal Operations Research, conducted by INFORMS members UBC Sauder professor Steven Shechter, Woonghee Tim Huh of UBC Sauder, and Alireza Sabouri of the University of Calgary, devised a strategy— the first evidence-based tool of its kind— that would reduce the number of risky transplants by 23 per cent and reduce the annual number of screenings by 27 per cent.

“Tortured” artists are actually less creative, study suggests

“Tortured” artists are actually less creative, study suggests

Hyperallergic, December 6, 2017

In a new study published in the INFORMS journal Management Science, economists Kathryn Graddy, of Brandeis University, and Carl Lieberman, of Princeton University, focus on one specific source of an artist’s misery: the death of loved ones. Their paper, “Death Bereavement, and Creativity,” centers on the psychological notion of “flow,” a person’s most creative state, and how it is interrupted by the loss of a parent, spouse, child, or friend as grief occupies the mind.

Contrary to cliché, misery may inhibit creativity

Contrary to cliché, misery may inhibit creativity

Pacific Standard magazine, December 5, 2017

The tortured artist is a familiar archetype. But does misery really produce masterpieces? A 2016 study that examined the lives of three major classical composers suggests as much. But a new paper in the INFORMS journal Management Science that focuses on painters comes to the opposite conclusion.

Engineering management student presents research at national conference

Engineering management student presents research at national conference

Penn State News, December 4, 2017

An international student in the Master of Engineering Management program at Pennsylvania State University, Samarth Patel, had a unique opportunity to present data on New York City’s bike sharing system, CitiBike, at the INFORMS Annual Meeting in Houston this October.

First study to find link between testosterone and stock market instability

First study to find link between testosterone and stock market instability

POST Online Media, November 30, 2017

According to a new study in the INFORMS journal Management Science, high testosterone levels among young, male stock market traders could be a significant contributor to fluctuations in the market, as high testosterone levels can cause these traders to overestimate future stock values and change their trading behavior, leading to dangerous prices bubbles and subsequent crashes.

Why stand in line on Black Friday? The psychology explained

Why stand in line on Black Friday? The psychology explained

The New York Times, November 23, 2017

INFORMS Fellow and MIT professor Richard Larson provides interesting insight into the unique draw of the long lines and even longer waits that shoppers are willing to endure in order to score a Black Friday deal.

If Lehman Brothers had been called Lehman Sisters ... Research measured the dangerous effects of testosterone on the stock market

If Lehman Brothers had been called Lehman Sisters ... Research measured the dangerous effects of testosterone on the stock market

Business Insider Italia, November 11, 2017

According to a study published in the INFORMS journal Management Science, entitled The Bull of Wall Street: Experimental Analysis of Testosterone and Asset Trading, testosterone contributes to fluctuations and in particular leads to overestimating values ​​and building dangerous bubbles and consequently leading to financial crackdowns.