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Isenberg Professor Shares Expertise on War on Ukraine

Isenberg Professor Shares Expertise on War on Ukraine

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, March 21, 2022

Anna Nagurney, the Eugene M. Isenberg Chair in Integrative Studies, is known for her expertise in supply chains, logistics, and disaster management. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, she has spoken regularly to local, national, and international media outlets about the product supply chain issues, blood supply disruptions, and vaccine distribution questions that have arisen.

How the War in Ukraine Is Further Disrupting Global Supply Chains

How the War in Ukraine Is Further Disrupting Global Supply Chains

Harvard Business Review, March 17, 2022

The invasion of Ukraine by Russia and sanctions imposed on it for doing so and new pandemic-related shutdowns in China are the latest events to rock global supply chains. Combined with the China-U.S. trade war and other pandemic- and climate-related disruptions, it is certain to accelerate the movement by Western companies to reduce their dependency on China for components and finished goods and on Russia for transportation and raw materials and to lead to more localized, or regional, sourcing strategies. If China decides to back Russia in the Ukraine conflict, it would only fuel that movement.

Russia-Ukraine war and global food security: What’s at stake?

Russia-Ukraine war and global food security: What’s at stake?

Feedstuff365, March 16, 2022

The war in Ukraine is no longer just a story about a conflict between nations. It’s having an immediate impact on millions of people and creating multitudes of refugees, which in turn is creating a worldwide humanitarian crisis and exasperating global food insecurity. Likewise, the supply chain for goods has become greatly challenged. How can the West address and overcome these disruptions while taking a hard line against Russia’s aggression? We talk with Anna Nagurney, Ph.D., professor of supply chains, logistics and economics at the University of Massachusetts, about the current state of global events and what’s at stake.

Is a COVID-19 spring break surge inevitable?

Is a COVID-19 spring break surge inevitable?

The Hill, March 15, 2022

College students around the nation are partaking in the annual rite commonly referred to as spring break. Many students are heading down to cities in Florida and other warm destinations to enjoy beaches and bars, socializing as only college students can during their mid-semester break.

Financial compensations need to be large to reduce vaccine hesitancy

Financial compensations need to be large to reduce vaccine hesitancy

News Medici Net, March 15, 2022

Willingness to vaccinate is critical in overcoming the COVID-19 pandemic. About 45 percent of Americans are not vaccinated and among those vaccinated, less than 30 percent have received a booster. Financial incentives and other nudges have been used to help increase vaccination rates across the nation, but new research from the University of California San Diego's Rady School of Management reveals that compensations need to be large-;at least $100-;to reduce vaccine hesitancy.

NC reaction: How US energy independence could impact gas prices

NC reaction: How US energy independence could impact gas prices

CBS17, March 15, 2022

GREENVILLE, N.C. (WNCT) – With rising gas prices, the hot-topic issue of domestic oil drilling is once again making headlines.

Congressman Greg Murphy (R-03) said energy independence would make us less susceptible to conflicts overseas. However, one professor of supply chain management, said the United States doesn’t have enough oil to rely only on itself.

Five Dark-Horse Teams That Could Crash the Men’s Final Four

Five Dark-Horse Teams That Could Crash the Men’s Final Four

Sports Illustrated, March 15, 2022

The last time the men’s Final Four was composed entirely of teams from the top-three seed lines was way back in 2009. While overall, 74% of Final Four teams since 1985 have been a No. 1, No. 2 or No. 3 seed, (per BracketOdds), that still means more than a quarter come from elsewhere. Figuring out who that’s going to be every year (often, it’s just one of the four teams) can be like finding a needle in a haystack—after all, who saw No. 11–seed UCLA coming a year ago? Or No. 11 Loyola Chicago in 2018? Still, we’re going to give it our best shot. Here are five teams seeded No. 4 or lower who could make the trip to New Orleans, plus three more we considered.