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Colin Murray

Colin Murray

BBC, November 16, 2020

After Kamala Harris made history as vice-president elect of the United States, Colin asks if these historic breakthrough moments translate to real progress. Just weeks on from the campaign, Colin also looks at all the latest developments and discusses the influence of social media on the result of Election 2020.

It’s Managers, Not Workers, Who Are Losing Jobs To AI And Robots, Study Shows

It’s Managers, Not Workers, Who Are Losing Jobs To AI And Robots, Study Shows

Forbes, November 15, 2020

Managers, not lower-level employees, are seeing their ranks diminished with the onset of artificial intelligence and robots, a new study out of the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School finds. That’s because as AI and robotics expands within a business, managers can oversee a wider breadth of operations.

This Is Why the COVID-19 Vaccine Is Going to Take Longer Than You Think

This Is Why the COVID-19 Vaccine Is Going to Take Longer Than You Think

Livestrong.com, November 14, 2020

If you believe the hype, a COVID-19 vaccine is just weeks away. Experts say widespread vaccination could help bring the deadly pandemic to its knees, so let's hope a safe, effective vaccine emerges from clinical trials. But don't count on getting your shots just yet.

Moderna, Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccines are Temperature Sensitive. Chicago's Cold Storage Facilities Face Major Challeneges.

Moderna, Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccines are Temperature Sensitive. Chicago's Cold Storage Facilities Face Major Challeneges.

Chicago Tribune, November 13, 2020

Chicago plays a key role in the nation’s supply chain, which is gearing up for the logistics challenge of a lifetime: mass distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine. Yet the complexity of the vaccine rollout and unique facilities requirements mean Chicago’s sprawling network of warehouses — which includes more than 11 million square feet of freezer and cooler space — may not play a major role. That’s because there’s a big difference between storing foods like hamburger patties, frozen peas and ice cream, and preserving a promising Pfizer vaccine that must stay below Arctic-winter temperatures.

Covid-19 Vaccines Could Depend on the Strength of This Vial

Covid-19 Vaccines Could Depend on the Strength of This Vial

Tradeticker.news, November 13, 2020

Near the back of a Corning Inc. glassmaking plant here, a robot picked up a cage packed with hundreds of tiny vials and plunged it into a salt bath bubbling at more than 500 degrees Fahrenheit. The hot soak for several hours is a key step in fortifying the glass vials from cracks, flakes and breaks that could thwart global efforts to stop the coronavirus. Drugmakers and health authorities are counting on Corning’s new medical glass container, named Valor, to protect Covid-19 vaccines better than conventional ones, especially during initial months when supplies will be limited and little can afford to be lost.

COVIVD-19 Vaccines Could Depend on the Strength of This Vial

COVIVD-19 Vaccines Could Depend on the Strength of This Vial

The Wall Street Journal, November 13, 2020

Near the back of a Corning Inc. glassmaking plant here, a robot picked up a cage packed with hundreds of tiny vials and plunged it into a salt bath bubbling at more than 500 degrees Fahrenheit. The hot soak for several hours is a key step in fortifying the glass vials from cracks, flakes and breaks that could thwart global efforts to stop the coronavirus.

'I See Something Terrible Happening Now': Exponential COVID-19 Growth Worries Experts

'I See Something Terrible Happening Now': Exponential COVID-19 Growth Worries Experts

Fox 47, November 13, 2020

As COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths surge, experts see no sign of the increases slowing down unless there are some major changes. “It took about seven and a half months or so get to the first 100,000 cases in Wisconsin,” said Ajay Sethi, assistant professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “It took about 36 days only to get the next 100,000 cases. We’re on track to getting the next 100,000 cases 20 days later.”

Maryland Hospitals Rush to Buy Ultra-Cold Freezers to Provide COVID-19 Vaccines a Warm Welcome

Maryland Hospitals Rush to Buy Ultra-Cold Freezers to Provide COVID-19 Vaccines a Warm Welcome

The Baltimore Sun, November 12, 2020

They are the size of large kitchen refrigerators, consume a lot of electricity and keep things very, very cold. LifeBridge Health ordered three of these ultra-low temperature freezers about four weeks ago in anticipation of approvals for the first COVID-19 vaccines. That includes one from the drug maker Pfizer, a frontrunner in the race to market, which reported promising data Monday on its high level of effectiveness.

Should Students be on Campus? Here's How Yale Decides

Should Students be on Campus? Here's How Yale Decides

Yale News, November 12, 2020

With national COVID-19 case numbers at an all-time high, University administrators face a difficult task in bringing students to and from campus safely. At Yale, decisions relating to the coronavirus largely fall to University COVID-19 Coordinator Stephanie Spangler and University President Peter Salovey. To make decisions, Spangler consults the Public Health Committee, which is made up of Salovey’s Chief of Staff, the Director of Yale Health, multiple public health experts and the Deputy General Counsel.

Former Ebola Czar Boosts Biden’s COVID Response Coordination

Former Ebola Czar Boosts Biden’s COVID Response Coordination

Bloomberg Law, November 12, 2020

The former Ebola czar who will be running President-elect Joe Biden’s White House has a knack for getting government agencies to cooperate while digging out from economic crises, colleagues said. Biden’s decision to tap Ron Klain, a Washington insider who led the nation’s Ebola response in 2014 and 2015, as his chief of staff will be critical as the administration likely will be responsible for rolling out a vaccine nationwide and could be dealing with more surges in Covid-19 cases.

Fears of Holiday Gift Shortages May Be Unfounded

Fears of Holiday Gift Shortages May Be Unfounded

ABC 7 News, November 11, 2020

Not even the coronavirus can put a chill on Christmas. Santa and his elves are working feverishly to get all the gifts out on time for the holiday. Memories of empty shelves at the beginning of the outbreak are for the most part faded. Analysts predict that once again the Grinch will not be able to steal Christmas. "I don't see a lot of the strain that people anticipated," said Sheldon Jacobson, a data analyst with the University of Illinois. "Like I said, that a lot of the gloom and doom that people anticipated is just not happening."

A Winter Surge in COVID-19 Cases Seems Inevitable. Can We Stop It?

A Winter Surge in COVID-19 Cases Seems Inevitable. Can We Stop It?

Concord Monitor, November 11, 2020

Temperatures are dropping, nights are growing longer, the holidays are nearing, and the science is clear: The pandemic is far from over. A long, dark winter awaits. The number of new coronavirus cases in the United States each day has ballooned from less than 40,000 in early September to more than 100,000 in early November. The U.S. now confirms more cases in a single day than China has reported since the pandemic began.

Wisconsin on Track To Double Its Total COVID-19 Deaths by Year's End

Wisconsin on Track To Double Its Total COVID-19 Deaths by Year's End

Wisconsin Public Radio, November 11, 2020

National and state experts say it's very possible that Wisconsin will double its total number of COVID-19 deaths before the end of the year, based on predictive modeling. In a statewide address Tuesday night, Gov. Tony Evers cited an estimate from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington that Wisconsin could see 5,059 COVID-19 deaths by Jan. 1. As of Wednesday, the state had reported 2,457 deaths from COVID-19, an increase of 62 deaths from Tuesday.

Planes, Dry Ice, Pharmacies: The Logistical Challenges of COVID-19

Planes, Dry Ice, Pharmacies: The Logistical Challenges of COVID-19

Yahoo! Finance, November 10, 2020

The United States could be the first country to launch one of the most ambitious vaccine operations in history: distributing and administering up to 600 million doses of a Covid-19 vaccine in just a few months. Massive vaccine campaigns are nothing new -- they have been carried out for decades in the fight against the measles and flu, for example. 

NC State Researchers Take On COVID-19

NC State Researchers Take On COVID-19

NC State News, November 10, 2020

While COVID-19, the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, has brought much of the world to a standstill, it hasn’t stopped research at NC State. Faculty and the staff at the university have pivoted from their customary research to study COVID-19, using their expertise in battling the pandemic. Their research has covered a large scope, from how the novel coronavirus can be effectively managed and analyzed to how it affects society’s food safety and supply chains.

Thanksgiving Will Soon Empty Campuses. Will Students Bring Coronavirus Home?

Thanksgiving Will Soon Empty Campuses. Will Students Bring Coronavirus Home?

The New York Times, November 9, 2020

As Thanksgiving approaches, millions of Americans are weighing the risk of pandemic travel against the yearning to visit friends and family. But one group seems all but certain to be heading home in large numbers just in time for turkey and holiday gatherings: college students. Since the start of the fall semester, most universities have planned to end in-person classes before Thanksgiving and require students to finish the term remotely, partly to avoid an expected wave of cold-weather infections. That means that in a couple of weeks, hundreds of thousands of students will be streaming back to hometowns until the spring semester begins.

Pfizer's COVID-19 Vaccine: What to Know

Pfizer's COVID-19 Vaccine: What to Know

Fox Business, November 9, 2020

The duo's vaccine, known as BNT162b2, proved to be 90% effective after being tested on nearly 44,000 participants in its Phase III study.  This is a significant milestone in the fight against a virus that has infected more than 50 million people around the globe, resulting in over 1.2 million deaths. FOX Business takes a look at the key data points investors and consumers should know, as well as reactions from business and political leaders.

The Coronavirus Vaccine: Everything You Need to Know

The Coronavirus Vaccine: Everything You Need to Know

Glamour, November 9, 2020

The U.S. just reached a dark milestone: 10 million reported coronavirus cases. But there is also big news for a potential coronavirus vaccine. On November 9, Pfizer and German drugmaker BioNTech announced that data from their ongoing coronavirus vaccine trial shows the vaccine is more than 90% effective in preventing COVID-19, per the New York Times.