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The downside of over-responding to online reviews

The downside of over-responding to online reviews

Market Business News, October 4, 2018

When managers respond to online reviews they risk triggering a large number of negative reviews, says a new study in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science. When consumers believe their online reviews might have influence, they are more likely to engage in negative reviewing. In other words, if we think our comment may influence a specific company, we are more likely to write negatively about it.

We slow as we age, but may not need to slow too much

We slow as we age, but may not need to slow too much

The New York Times, October 3, 2018

New research from former INFORMS President Ed Kaplan and a colleague from Yale University updates a popular formula and calculator that runners past the age of 40 can use to determine how fast we can expect to slow down and provides us with reasonable, age-appropriate finishing-time targets for ourselves.

Hotels: Responding to online reviews may be a bad strategy

Hotels: Responding to online reviews may be a bad strategy

Hospitality Technology, October 2, 2018

A new study to be published in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science found that when managers respond to online reviews it’s possible that those responses could actually stimulate additional reviewing activity and an increased number of negative reviews.

New study doubles number of illegal immigrants living in U.S.

New study doubles number of illegal immigrants living in U.S.

Fox & Friends, September 25, 2018

Former INFORMS president and Yale University professor of operations research, public health, and engineering Ed Kaplan and professor of economics and management at Yale University Jonathan Feinstein discuss their new study which found the number of illegal immigrants currently living in the United States is nearly twice as high as previously thought, at 22 million rather than 11 million.

Friends' influence helps telecom firms retain customers

Friends' influence helps telecom firms retain customers

Carnegie Mellon University News, September 19, 2018

Retaining customers is a central concern in many industries, including IT markets, where churn rates—the rate at which subscribers to a service discontinue their subscriptions—are high. A new study in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science by researchers from Carnegie Mellon University tested a strategy to help a telecommunications firm manage churn. Contacting not only customers but also their friends helped reduce the customers’ propensity to discontinue their ties to the company.

Resoundingly Human: September

Resoundingly Human: September

Stitcher, September 14, 2018

In this episode of the INFORMS podcast, Resoundingly Human, we explore three unique ways that operations research and analytics are being used to save lives, save money, and solve problems. Our guests include John Dickerson of the University of Maryland and Tuomas Sandholm of Carnegie Mellon University whose research on improving kidney exchange success could significantly improve the number of successful kidney transplants; Eva Lee of the Georgia Institute of Technology whose research in pediatric heart surgery has unexpectedly provided new insight to help fight America’s opioid epidemic; and Tallys Yunes of the Miami Business School who has some very valuable insight that can help all the fantasy football fans out there use O.R. to improve their lineups.

Syrian War yields new predictive model for attrition dynamics in multilateral war

Syrian War yields new predictive model for attrition dynamics in multilateral war

Space War, September 12, 2018

Three researchers have conducted a study of war, specifically the current conflict in Syria that's been raging since 2011, to arrive at the creation of a new predictive model for multilateral war, which is called the Lanchester multiduel. The research, published in the August edition of the INFORMS journal Operations Research, is titled "The Attrition Dynamics of Multilateral War." 

Innovative kidney matching process can improve success rates of kidney transplants

Innovative kidney matching process can improve success rates of kidney transplants

News Medical, September 6, 2018

A new study has sought to address the challenges of the kidney exchange program and introduced the concept of "failure-aware" algorithmic matching to improve success rates. The study, "Failure-Aware Kidney Exchange," was conducted by John Dickerson of the University of Maryland, and Ariel Procaccia and Tuomas Sandholm of Carnegie Mellon University, and published in the INFORMS journal Management Science.

Machines know when someone’s about to attempt suicide. How should we use that information?

Machines know when someone’s about to attempt suicide. How should we use that information?

Quartz, September 5, 2018

A patient goes into the emergency room for a broken toe, is given a series of standardized tests, has their data fed into an algorithm, and—though they haven’t mentioned feeling depressed or having any suicidal thoughts—the machine identifies them as at high risk of suicide in the next week. Though the patient didn’t ask for help, medical professionals must now broach the subject of suicide and find some way of intervening. This scenario, where an actionable diagnosis comes not from a doctor’s evaluation or family member’s concern, but an algorithm, is an imminent reality.