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Chinese Invasion of Taiwan Could Undermine Global Semiconductor Market | Opinion

Chinese Invasion of Taiwan Could Undermine Global Semiconductor Market | Opinion

Newsweek, April 15, 2022

Semiconductors are foundational to modern life, enabling everything from our phones to the energy grid. But increased offshore demand for semiconductors, accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic, has resulted in a global shortage—affecting virtually every industry. Some predict that the chip shortage will continue into 2023. On top of an already stressed supply chain, Russia's invasion of Ukraine has led to new concerns for the semiconductor industry, both because Ukraine produces over half of the world's supply of neon gas—which is used in the production of chips—and because of the precedent that it sets for a potential Chinese invasion of Taiwan.

Global hunger crisis looms as war in Ukraine sends food prices soaring

Global hunger crisis looms as war in Ukraine sends food prices soaring

Bulletin of the Atomic Sciences, April 12, 2022

The war in Ukraine sent global food prices soaring to an all-time high in March, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. The March record surpassed the also-record-breaking change in food prices observed in February when the war began. The organization calculates a food price index that measures a monthly change in international prices of a basket of commonly traded food commodities such as vegetable oils, cereals, and meat. The current index value is approximately 37 percent higher than one year ago. The news has raised fears of a world hunger crisis with far-reaching effects.

Study: Front-Pack Symbols Affect Buying

Study: Front-Pack Symbols Affect Buying

Food Processing, April 8, 2022

Front-of-package symbols appear to have had an effect on breakfast cereal consumers in Chile, prompting them toward healthier products, according to new research.

Exports of an Indian COVID-19 vaccine halted after WHO finds problems at manufacturing plant

Exports of an Indian COVID-19 vaccine halted after WHO finds problems at manufacturing plant

Science, April 7, 2022

The World Health Organization (WHO) has raised unspecified concerns about the manufacturing of Covaxin, one of India’s home-grown COVID-19 vaccines. On 2 April, WHO said it had found problems during a March inspection of the production facilities of Bharat Biotech, the vaccine’s producer. WHO did not disclose the nature of the problems at the plant, which is located in Hyderabad, in Telangana state. But it said Bharat Biotech has agreed to stop exports of Covaxin and is “developing a corrective and preventive action plan.”

The Failure of Covid.gov Is Worse Than Inexcusable

The Failure of Covid.gov Is Worse Than Inexcusable

The Washington Post, April 6, 2022

More than two years into a global pandemic that has claimed millions of lives, the U.S. government has finally launched what it calls a “one-stop shop” website for resources on Covid-19 services, mitigation and treatment options. While the page — Covid.gov — links to the existing tool for ordering rapid test kits, it mostly just aggregates information.

Ukraine will need ‘Marshall Plan’ to address human toll of war

Ukraine will need ‘Marshall Plan’ to address human toll of war

Chicago Sun-Times, April 5, 2022

In the weeks since Russia invaded Ukraine in late February, the news and social media platforms have been filled with images, video and stories of countless tragedies and atrocities involving children, men and women. The lives of many families have been destroyed, along with their homes, businesses and the economy.

Demand for electric vehicles rocketing as gas prices climb

Demand for electric vehicles rocketing as gas prices climb

News Nation, April 5, 2022

Electric car sales in the U.S. more than doubled in 2021, surpassing half a million, according to the International Energy Agency. Gas prices aren’t single-handedly responsible for the growing interest in electric vehicles, but they are a contributing factor. With technological and design improvements, that demand is likely to keep growing, said Erin Baker, a professor of engineering and the director of the Energy Transition Institute at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Russian cyberattacks are a threat. But so is Americans’ fear of shortages

Russian cyberattacks are a threat. But so is Americans’ fear of shortages

Pioneer, April 5, 2022

Reports of Russian cyberattacks against our domestic infrastructure have raised alarms and calls for heightened vigilance across the United States’ public and private sectors. Given that the U.S. and its allies have imposed significant economic sanctions against Russia for its attack of Ukraine, state-sponsored Russian cyberattacks are likely; they may be viewed as an effective form of retaliation.

When Will You Know the Pandemic Is Over?

When Will You Know the Pandemic Is Over?

Government Executive, April 1, 2022

How will we know when the COVID-19 pandemic is at an end? Will we live with the virus forever? What happens next? Experts have some answers for you.